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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
been declared space day by california governor jerry brown who will be visiting jpl and meeting with the rover team later on. in the meantime, we'll start with our panel. and we're going to introduce them first of all we have michael mief michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars program in washington. pete tisinger, the msl project manager for jpl and we have roger weans, los alamos national laboratory in new mexico. matt heverly is next, here at jpl and roger weans then is the principle investigator at cem in los alamos in new mexico, last but not least, joy crisp, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we'll start off with a special announcement this morning from michael meyer. >> well, thank you. actually, before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars of mariner 9. this was in november of 1971, and in the video you'll see a couple of people you might recognize like bruce murray and carl seguin and ray bradbury. so if we could look at that video. >> i was ho
, integrated chief from jpl. doug ellison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> good morning. another fantastic day on mars -- curiosity continues to be paved basically flawlessly. we executed all the planned activities successfully yesterday. it is a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly. completing all planned activities as well. it is really just a great day all around. the activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to do -- upgrade our software on the rover. just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or a laptop or something -- we will do the same thing. we will have a new flight software that is optimized for service. we landed with one optimized for landing. that does not have to operate the arm and all that. the surface is not have to land the vehicle. we want to switch to this new software that is optimized for service operations. we will do that starting tomorrow. -- the day after tomorrow, sorry. we'll start that activity. we will do preparation for that activit
of people out here at jpl about the prospect of putting curiosity down at this location and about the pictures and ideas that will come back right away. take a listen to what they said. >> there's a lot of intellectual investment. the team has developed a truly fantastic, novel architecture that is the product of our imagination. it is exactly what we think it should be. so we are all in on this. >> reporter: they are definitely all in, and we can give you kind of a close up look of what curiosity pretty much looks like. this is obviously not curiosity itself, it's a model. it gives you an idea. about the size of an suv, and the technology on this, kelly, is unbelievable. >> as you've heard, they're all in, and if all goes well, what will this rover be doing when it actually it was down? >> reporter: well, you can get an idea. we have animation but also from ththe --live look as well. this rover -- the best way to put it. if you've been to the grand canyon or seen pictures, you've seen stripes of rock going all the way down the canyon. each one of those stripes is a slice of life.
, the team chief from jpl, and doug allison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave flawlessly and executed all the planned activities successfully after a period is a good time to point out that the teen operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly and completing all planned activities is well-preparedsol 3 activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to upgrade our software on the rover. we needed new flight software load that is optimized for the service garrett kern we want to switch to a new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting, the day after tomorrow. we have to do a little prep work for that activity. refit of some files to get ready to for the software transition garrett kern the other thing was to check out some more of our instruments. we checked out the instruments and that all past successfully and are all in great shape as far as we know. that is a great sign. no anomaly showed up in any of the tests. we took a lot
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
watkins, the mission manager. miguel from jpl the chief engineer. sarah from jpl she is the high- rise investigation scientist. and john of caltech the project scientist of the mission. >> good morning everyone. welcome to mars, welcome back to march if he were here last night. the surface mission of curiosity has begun. for a long time, those of us on the project knew we had to go through some big events. but we built this rover not just to land on mars but to actually try weimar's and execute a beautiful science mission. we have ended one phase of the mission and to be a joy a lot of folks on our team. another part has just begun. it is really the fundamental reason we built a rover. we are just starting admission. we are not ending it. two hours after landing. just before 1:00 a.m., curiosity called us from mars odyssey. mars odyssey was overhead. it comes around two hours later. mars has rotated. it was still over the horizon. we were able to have a short talk with curiosity. she told us she is in service nominal mode. she quickly transitioned to surface and nominal mode. not in sa
is yet to come. we will start with the question and answer part. we will start here at jpl. wait for the microphone runner to get to you. we will go in the first row first. state your name and affiliation. >> irish television. could we get times on the major events for the hga deploy and mast. >> i will provide this to you after this. >> if you could talk about the geology. there seems to be three distinct ideological regions. is that the thermal inertia is known as? >> i've been so busy but this mahli -- with this mahli step. you can see the heat shield is on the surface with lots of small creatures. curiosity is on a surface that has a rounded hills and your small creatures. north of curiosity is this leiter toned terrain with lots of basins and pets. if it was up to me i would go to where those three come together. as a starting point. [laughter] you can start to get a flavor of what is going on here. do you want to say anything? >> i just made that up. >> we're going to take another question. it was in the same row but two people to the left. >> hello. i come from france. you
from jpl. all those instruments, all those things are done at a very slow process right now. i know we're very impatient, we want to get pictures. >> i know. bring them now. >> they don't want to blow fuses. everything nice and slow and methodical. do one thing at a time. raise the mast. raise the cameras. the cameras we're seeing here are mounted on the front of the vehicle. the cameras we are seeing were the avoidance cameras, so it doesn't run into something it didn't know was there. that's all we have for you today. >> you always want to think there's some way to control it from here as well. chad myer, john zarrella, guys, thank you for bringing it back into english for us. we appreciate that. >>> here's what we're working on for this hour. police say this man was planning a deadly attack on a movie theater playing the new batman movie. we have the latest on this unbelievable story. >>> and the man who gunned down six people at a sikh temple is connected to white supremacist bands. we'll talk about the growing problem of hate groups in america. >>> and we're still live from the je
-- in the michigan, team chief from jpl. and dougie ellison, visualization producer at jpl, and we will begin with michael watkins. >> a very good morning. we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave basically flawlessly. and executing all the planned activities successfully and phenomenal yesterday. a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is performing basically it flawlessly and completing of planned activities. this is really just a great day all around. so the activity consists of a couple of different things. we are about to -- it would like to upgrade our software on the rover, just like we upgrade our uprighted system under on computer and laptop. we're going to do the same thing. we need a fellow that is optimized. we landed on one that is optimized for lending. but the same token the surface does not have the land the vehicle. you want to switch to this new flight software that is optimized for surface operations, and we're going to do that starting tomorrow. so a little prep work for that activity. we're going to check out the back u
think it's in the 9s. those engineers at jpl are really good. >> landing on mars has been a tricky thing. 70% of the missions that landed on mars have failed. that's both the u.s. and with russia as well. what are the factors that complicate this? >> the atmosphere of mars is thick enough to heat your spacecraft and melt it on the way in if you don't slow down in the right way. it's thin enough that it's hard to slow down. it's a delicate balance between slowing down fast enough and not slowing down at all. that's what takes this incredibly complicated heat shield parachute rocket sky crane maneuver. >> not to mention, this is something that scientists won't be seeing in real time. there's going to be a delay. why? >> well, it takes 14 minutes at this point for light to get from mars to earth. radio signals too. so this lander will be on the surface of mars in one piece or many for seven minutes before the signal gets back to earth to tell us that it's successful or not. >> we've had missions like this before. what makes this one different in. >> well, this one, it's the size of a smart
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
us do it to request this wee. >> hubert humphrey. on c-span3. >> now nasa engineers at the jpl in california give an update on the mars rover curiosity mission. they talk about the space craft landing on mars earlier this week and show pictures. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> welcome to the jp el. we are holding our finalists conference for the week. -- our final conference this we. >> this week, we have had a tremendous success in landing on mars and the beginning of the exploration of a new world. we're going to hear from a senior software engineer who will give us a preview of what's coming up in the next few days for the rover. first, we're going to hear from the descent and landing team. they have been poring over the data and have some new details for us. first, i want to introduce the lead, adam, and his deputy, miguel san martin. >> thank you, veronica. we have a talented panel here for you today. miguel and i wanted to be the ones to introduce them to you. leading off the rotation, the operations lead for descent and landing. from the johnson space flight cen
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)